Coral Pink Sand Dunes

So there’s this little state park in Utah, near Kanab, called Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park. (We know, it’s a mouthful to say.) It’s one of the smaller parks in the state, and certainly one of the least visited. But it’s also got something rather unique about it. For all intents and purposes, Coral Pink Sand Dunes is a giant sandbox for adults.

The vibrant pink dunes are formed when winds are forced through a notch in the Moquith and Moccasin mountains. The wind becomes so powerful that it rips the surrounding Navajo Sandstone to shreds. And then deposits all the eroded sand into a big pile in the park area. The landscape is always changing – continuous winds shift the dunes as much as 50-feet every year.

You can certainly hike around in Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park (try saying it ten times, fast-as-you-can) and it’s worth doing so, but most people go there with their toys. About 90% of the park is accessible to, and available for, off-road vehicles. So grab your dirt bikes and bring your assorted ATVs, because the dunes are perfect for motorized madness.

There is a little visitor center at the park, and a pretty cool overlook. There is also a conservation area for the Coral Pink Sand Dunes Tiger Beetle, a species which is found only in these pink dunes. A day-use fee of eight dollars is charged when entering the park. And if you want to stay overnight, you can camp at the main campground for $20. There is a dump station as well as and restrooms with showers. You can find directions to the park here.

Next time you’ve got an itch to play in the sand, go check out Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park. (Can we use an acronym? CPSDSP?) We think you’ll love it.

2017-02-27T19:50:42+00:00 February 27th, 2017|Outdoor adventures, Wildlife|